Aisquith Street Meetinghouse Donate Contact

History of the Aisquith Street Meetinghouse

1781

The Aisquith Street Meetinghouse is built by George Mathews and founded by Joseph Townsend.

1781-1800's

It quickly became a hub for Quakers in the surrounding areas; influential Baltimore merchants who were members include:
-    Johns Hopkins (1795 - 1873)
-    Moses Shepard (1771 - 1857)
-    Philip E. Thomas (1776 - 1861)
-    Elisha Tyson (1750 - 1824)
-    John McKim(1766 - 1842)(Pictured left)

1784

The members of Aisquith Street Meetinghouse established a committee that oversaw the development of the Friends School of Baltimore, with classes held in the Meetinghouse, which later became Friends School. Yearly meetings were such a well attended event that they bought 3 more acres of land to accommodate it.

1794

The Friends School of Baltimore moved in a small brick building on the east corner of the burial ground behind the Meetinghouse. It is said to be the first school in Baltimore. When Friends School was founded, it established the first school within Baltimore.

1807

The Lombard Street Meetinghouse was built because of a need for a place of worship for the growing Quaker community on the West side of Baltimore.

Early 1800's

The Meetinghouse also began to take on a new role during the period of abolitionism. Evidence points towards it being a "hotbed" for the underground railroad.

1810's-1820's

The Quaker community of Aisquith was separated due to disputes between Aisquith and Lombard due to the use of the burial ground behind the Aisquith Street Meetinghouse.

1819

Aiquith meeting became a subsidiary and preparative meeting of Lombard.

1825

Aisquith tried to become a full monthly meeting again, but was denied by Lombard.

1881

The community was brought back together by the 100th anniversary of the Meetinghouse’s construction. After 1881, as a result of the feuds throughout the 19th century, the attendance whittled away.

1921-1926

Most of those in the society of Friends had moved away from Aisquith; the building was abandoned and in much need of repair.

1926

Lombard Streetm Meeting (which moved to Park Avenue in 1889) decided to close the meeting at Aisquith although there were around 50 members still worshipping there. The city took the building and had plans to make it a part of the Public Park system.

1967

The Aisquith Meetinghouse was released to the McKim Community Association and became a part of their community center.

1991

Dwight Warren, the current executive director of McKim, with the help of the Quaker architect Bruce Manger, started a $370,000 rehabilitation project for the meetinghouse.

1996

The restoration of the Meetinghouse won the Maryland Historical Trust’s preservation award.

2008

A group of lifelong Quakers from all around Maryland and Virginia started meeting in the Seton Hill Meetinghouse.

2009

The group approached McKim about renting out Aisquith for a weekly Christian fellowship that came to be called the “Old Town Fellowship.”

2011 - 2012

Hurricane Irene caused a decent amount of damage to the meetinghouse. Due to declining attendance at meetings and lasting damage from Hurricane Irene, the Old Town Fellowship moved out of the Meetinghouse.

Moving Forward

Hurricane Irene caused a decent amount of damage to the meetinghouse. Due to declining attendance at meetings and lasting damage from Hurricane Irene, the Old Town Fellowship moved out of the Meetinghouse.